Stanway Fountain

The glory of the Stanway watergarden is the single-jet fountain in the Canal, opened on 5th June 2004. Originally suggested by Paul Edwards, the landscape architect, and engineered by David Bracey of The Fountain Workshop Limited, the fountain rises
magnificently to over 300 feet, making it the tallest fountain in Britain (seconded by Witley Court at 121 feet), the tallest gravity fountain in the world (seconded by the Fountain of Fame at La Granja de San Ildefonso, Segovia, Spain at 154 feet), and the second tallest fountain in Europe, after the 400-foot-high turbine-driven fountain in Lake Geneva. The fountain has a 2-inch bronze nozzle and is driven from an 100,000-gallon reservoir, 580 feet above the Canal, via a 12-inch diameter medium-density polyethylene pipe 2 kilometres long.

Stanway House - The Gardens Stanway House - The Gardens

Stanway Gardens

The Stanway Watergarden, one of the finest in England, was created in the 1720s for John Tracy, probably by Charles Bridgeman, gardener to Lord Cobham at Stowe, Buckinghamshire from 1719 and Royal Gardener from 1727, who invented the English style of gardening, which superceded the Franco-Dutch style.

Typically Bridgemanic is the Canal, a magnificent formal sheet of water, situated unusually on a terrace 25 feet above the house, and the Cascade (the largest in Britain, partially restored), fed by water flowing under the Pyramid from the Pyramid Pond.

The Tithe Barn Pond adds to the watery feel of the garden, which also includes fine specimen trees, broad terraced lawns and herbaceous borders.